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The Gibson Brothers

The Gibson Brothers

Photo by Alysse Gafkjen

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  • Mockingbird

    Available November 9
    The Gibson Brothers—siblings Eric and Leigh Gibson—have already made over a dozen albums, but none quite like the new Dan Auerbach–produced Mockingbird. Their newest venture is an effortless blend of classic '70s-infused rock and timeless country, a modern twist on their traditional bluegrass sound, and harmonies that will keep you wishing for more.
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about The Gibson Brothers

The Gibson Brothers' new album, Mockingbird, is a project 20 years in the making. The celebrated bluegrass duo—named back-to-back Entertainers of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association in 2012 and 2013—played the Nashville game two decades ago and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too "retro" for modern country music. Today, such a tag, along with "authentic" and "outlaw," is a buzzword, and all three can describe the marvelous Mockingbird.

A mix of smooth country and Seventies rock, the album further cements the sibling duo of Leigh and Eric Gibson—still only in their 40s—as musical trailblazers. As players and vocalists, they are superb, harmonizing as only siblings can; while as songwriters they stand without peer, honored as Songwriters of the Year by the two leading bluegrass organizations. The 10 tracks on Mockingbird, their 14th album, draw on much of the brothers' experiences being raised in upstate New York, where they still reside on their family's farm.

"The...

The Gibson Brothers' new album, Mockingbird, is a project 20 years in the making. The celebrated bluegrass duo—named back-to-back Entertainers of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association in 2012 and 2013—played the Nashville game two decades ago and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too "retro" for modern country music. Today, such a tag, along with "authentic" and "outlaw," is a buzzword, and all three can describe the marvelous Mockingbird.

A mix of smooth country and Seventies rock, the album further cements the sibling duo of Leigh and Eric Gibson—still only in their 40s—as musical trailblazers. As players and vocalists, they are superb, harmonizing as only siblings can; while as songwriters they stand without peer, honored as Songwriters of the Year by the two leading bluegrass organizations. The 10 tracks on Mockingbird, their 14th album, draw on much of the brothers' experiences being raised in upstate New York, where they still reside on their family's farm.

"The songs on this album are the sound we heard growing up, riding around with our dad, who was a farmer, in his pickup, or with our mom in her station wagon. This sound was on the radio," says Leigh, citing the Eagles, Bob Seger and Tom Petty as influences for Mockingbird, produced by the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach with David Ferguson (Johnny Cash).

Songs like "Cool Drink of Water" and "Love the Land" exemplify that late-Sixties and early-Seventies vibe. The former sounds like something Elvis, at the height of his '68 Comeback cool, would have recorded, while "Love the Land" is inspired by the simple desire to spend more time in nature. "I love the land that loves this man / and sets his soul at ease," goes the centerpiece lyric. The song also provides the album with its title, as Leigh sings about the "song so sweet" of the mockingbird. "They're an interpreter of different sounds and that's what we're doing here," says Leigh. "We're known for one sound, but we're interpreting a new part of our musicality."

Coloring outside the lines is not unfamiliar to the Gibson Brothers, whose innate talent as writers and vocalists allows them to float seamlessly between genres. In that way, they're outlaws—refusing to be confined to just one sound. Which is why they chose to work with a rock producer and a band of legendary session players like drummer Gene Chrisman and bassist Dave Roe for Mockingbird.

Listen to "Come Down," which evokes the sound of soft-rock kings America, or the passionate R&B of "Lay Your Body Down." Both dispel any notion that the Gibsons are solely a bluegrass act and prove Eric and Leigh's gift for penning boundary-pushing songs. Likewise, "Sweet Lucinda," with its shuffling rhythm, taps into country-rock, and "I'm a Better Man" slinks along with Bobby Wood's hypnotic organ.

Mockingbird's most left-field track, however, is a cover of R.E.M.'s 1993 weeper "Everybody Hurts." Suggested by Ferguson, the ballad became the ideal duet for Leigh and Eric, with the brothers making the song their own via their yearning delivery and the house band's lush arrangement. "I think it's a beautiful song, but I couldn't picture us doing it," says Eric. "It surprised me with how it turned out. It was too good to not put on the record."

The members of R.E.M. certainly agree. "It's incredible! They did a great job," says vocalist Michael Stipe. "It really re-focuses the song and lyric in a great way." Bassist Mike Mills offers, "Wow. I really didn't see that one coming. I love it," with guitarist Peter Buck echoing those remarks: "Wow. Incredible." Even Bill Berry, R.E.M.'s former drummer chimes in, saying, "It's the best cover of it I've heard."

However, it's "Travelin' Day," the countriest song on Mockingbird, that packs a poignant punch. The first tune they wrote with Ferguson for the session, it was born of grief: Ferguson's stepfather had just died. The Gibsons lost their dad six years earlier and together the writers bonded over their loss. "We were talking about how Ferg's stepfather faced death and how impressive it was," says Leigh, "and it really inspired us."

Looking back on the brisk week and a half of writing and recording Mockingbird in Nashville, the Gibson Brothers are confident in what they've accomplished. This is an album that exemplifies the sibling bond and is poised to introduce them to an entirely new audience.

"We'll be able to reach more people than we have in the past," says Eric. "I don't want to downplay what we accomplished in bluegrass, but I didn't know our voices would suit this variety of music so well."

His brother agrees. "If you thought you knew the Gibson Brothers and had them figured out," Leigh says, "well, maybe you didn't."

TOUR DATES

Videos

PRESS RELEASE


  • THE GIBSON BROTHERS RETURN WITH MOCKINGBIRD, OUT NOVEMBER 9TH VIA EASY EYE SOUND

    DEBUT FIRST SINGLE “LAY YOUR BODY DOWN” VIA ROLLING STONE COUNTRY

    BROADCAST DEBUT VIA SIRIUSXM’S OUTLAW COUNTRY (CHANNEL 60)

    FEATURES PRODUCTION BY DAN AUERBACH & FERGIE FERGUSON AND PERFORMANCES BY AUERBACH, GENE CHRISMAN, BILLY SANFORD, AND DAVE ROE

     

    This morning, Bluegrass royalty Leigh and Eric Gibson announce the release of their 14th album, Mockingbird, produced by Grammy Award winners Dan Auerbach and Fergie Ferguson. The album is not just a return to form for the Gibson Brothers, but also a rebirth, and finds the brothers performing bluegrass, as well as a mix of country, soul and seventies rock. The album cements the sibling duo as players, songwriters and vocalists at the peak of their power, harmonizing as only siblings can, and Mockingbird’s 11 tracks draw on much of the brothers' experiences being raised on the family farm in Northern New York. "The songs on this album are the sounds we heard growing up, riding around with our dad, who was a farmer, in his pickup, or with our mom in her station wagon,” says Leigh. “This sound was on the radio.” He cites the Eagles, Bob Seger, Tom Petty, and the warm country sounds of Don Williams, Emmylou Harris and Waylon Jennings as influences for the album. Mockingbird is available for pre-order on all formats here.

    This morning, the band debuted “Lay Your Body Down,”  the first single off Mockingbird, via Rolling Stone Country who say the track “finds the sweet spot between Laurel Canyon folk-rock and early Seventies Rolling Stones with big, layered vocal harmonies and crunchy blues flourishes.” Listen to it here. Additionally, SiriusXM’s ­­Outlaw Country (channel 60) played the song in Mojo Nixon’s broadcast earlier this week.

    As Northerners growing up in a Southern business, The Gibson Brothers had to work twice as hard as the bands from the South to pay their dues, and were the first group from that far north to earn the coveted title of IBMA Entertainers of the Year, which they secured two years in a row. This outsider perspective is something innately familiar to the Brothers, and an asset, though this was not always the case. The pair played the Nashville game two decades ago, while in their early 20s, and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too "retro" for modern country music. Today, such characterizations, along with their authenticity, set them apart and their talent as writers and vocalists allows them to float seamlessly between genres. It’s for this reason that they chose to work with a rock producer, Auerbach, and a band of legendary session players like drummer Gene Chrisman and guitarist Billy Sanford for Mockingbird. “I was raised on bluegrass music, and The Gibson Brothers are one of this generation’s greatest in that style,” said Auerbach. “I’ve been a fan of theirs for a long time, and when Fergie brought up the idea of doing a non-traditional type of album with them, I jumped at the chance.” 

    Songs like "Cool Drink of Water" and "Love the Land" exemplify that late-Sixties and early-Seventies vibe. The former sounds like something Elvis, at the height of his '68 Comeback cool, would perform, and provides the album with its title, as Leigh sings about the "song so sweet" of the mockingbird.  "Come Down," evokes the 70’s sound of radio rock kings America and "Lay Your Body Down" concours a passionate Exile on Main Street style R&B.

    Mockingbird's most left-field track, however, is a cover of R.E.M.'s 1993 song "Everybody Hurts." Suggested by Ferguson, the ballad became the ideal duet for Leigh and Eric, with the brothers making the song their own via their yearning delivery and the house band's lush arrangement. "I think it's a beautiful song, but I couldn't picture us doing it," says Eric. "It surprised me with how it turned out. It was too good to not put on the record." The members of R.E.M. agree. "It's incredible! They did a great job," says vocalist Michael Stipe. Bill Berry, R.E.M.'s former drummer, and one of the original writers of the song, chimes in, saying, "It's the best cover of it I've heard."
     

    Most of all, Mockingbird dispels the notion that the Gibson’s are solely a bluegrass act. "I don't want to downplay what we accomplished in bluegrass,” says Eric, but I didn't know our voices would suit this variety of music so well." His brother agrees. "If you thought you knew the Gibson Brothers and had them figured out," Leigh says, "well, maybe you didn't."


    Mockingbird Track Listing

      01 Travelin' Day

      02 Cool Drink Of Water

      03 Love The Land

      04 Sweet Lucinda

      05 Special One

      06 Lay Your Body Down

      07 So Much Love In My Baby's Eyes

      08 Come Down

      09 Everybody Hurts

      10 I'm A Better Man

      11 Not Gonna Be Tonight

    The Gibson Brothers Tour Dates- http://www.gibsonbrothers.com/tour-1/
    Sep 07 /// Caffe Lena /// Saratoga Springs, NY

    Sep 08 /// Caffe Lena /// Saratoga Springs, NY

    Sep 14 ///Cockaigne Ski Resort Brewgrass Bluegrass Musc Festival /// Cherry Creek, NY

    Sep 15 /// Kirkland Art Center /// Clinton, NY

    Sep 21 /// Olathe Live! Concert Series /// Olathe, KS

    Sep 21 /// Olathe Live! Concert Series w/ Kelly Hunt /// Olathe, KS

    Sep 29 /// IBMA's Wide Open Bluegrass Festival /// Raleigh, NC

    Oct 06 /// 3 Sisters Music Festival /// Chattanooga, TN

    Oct 07 /// The Holland Theatre /// Bellefontaine, OH

    Oct 11/// A Little Help From My Friends @ Clayton Center /// Maryville, TN

    Oct 12 /// A Little Help From My Friends @ Imperial Theatre /// Augusta, GA

    Oct 20 /// Bloomin' Bluegrass Festival /// Farmers Branch, TX

    Oct 26 /// Anderson Bluegrass Festival /// Anderson, SC

    Nov 10 /// November Palatka Bluegrass Festival /// Palatka, FL

    Dec 07 /// Proctor's Theatre /// Schenectady, NY

    Dec 08 /// Barre Opera House /// Barre, VT

    Dec 13 //// Sellersville Theater /// Sellersville, PA

    Dec 16 /// Earlville Opera House /// Earlville, NY

    Jan 04 /// New Year's Bluegrass Festival /// Jekyll Island, GA

    Feb 02 /// Stone Mountain Arts Center /// Brownfield, ME

    Feb 14 /// February Palatka Festival /// Palatka, FL

    Mar 09 /// Stoughton Opera House /// Stoughton, WI

     

    For more information, please contact Mary Moyer (mary@qprime.com) or Emilio Herce (emilio@qprime.com) at Q Prime 212.302.9790.

     

Press Photos

gregg.schaufeld's picture
on August 27, 2018 - 11:40am

The Gibson Brothers' new album, Mockingbird, is a project 20 years in the making. The celebrated bluegrass duo—named back-to-back Entertainers of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association in 2012 and 2013—played the Nashville game two decades ago and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too "retro" for modern country music. Today, such a tag, along with "authentic" and "outlaw," is a buzzword, and all three can describe the marvelous Mockingbird.

A mix of smooth country and Seventies rock, the album further cements the sibling duo of Leigh and Eric Gibson—still only in their 40s—as musical trailblazers. As players and vocalists, they are superb, harmonizing as only siblings can; while as songwriters they stand without peer, honored as Songwriters of the Year by the two leading bluegrass organizations. The 10 tracks on Mockingbird, their 14th album, draw on much of the brothers' experiences being raised in upstate New York, where they still reside on their family's farm.

"The songs on this album are the sound we heard growing up, riding around with our dad, who was a farmer, in his pickup, or with our mom in her station wagon. This sound was on the radio," says Leigh, citing the Eagles, Bob Seger and Tom Petty as influences for Mockingbird, produced by the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach with David Ferguson (Johnny Cash).

Songs like "Cool Drink of Water" and "Love the Land" exemplify that late-Sixties and early-Seventies vibe. The former sounds like something Elvis, at the height of his '68 Comeback cool, would have recorded, while "Love the Land" is inspired by the simple desire to spend more time in nature. "I love the land that loves this man / and sets his soul at ease," goes the centerpiece lyric. The song also provides the album with its title, as Leigh sings about the "song so sweet" of the mockingbird. "They're an interpreter of different sounds and that's what we're doing here," says Leigh. "We're known for one sound, but we're interpreting a new part of our musicality."

Coloring outside the lines is not unfamiliar to the Gibson Brothers, whose innate talent as writers and vocalists allows them to float seamlessly between genres. In that way, they're outlaws—refusing to be confined to just one sound. Which is why they chose to work with a rock producer and a band of legendary session players like drummer Gene Chrisman and bassist Dave Roe for Mockingbird.

Listen to "Come Down," which evokes the sound of soft-rock kings America, or the passionate R&B of "Lay Your Body Down." Both dispel any notion that the Gibsons are solely a bluegrass act and prove Eric and Leigh's gift for penning boundary-pushing songs. Likewise, "Sweet Lucinda," with its shuffling rhythm, taps into country-rock, and "I'm a Better Man" slinks along with Bobby Wood's hypnotic organ.

Mockingbird's most left-field track, however, is a cover of R.E.M.'s 1993 weeper "Everybody Hurts." Suggested by Ferguson, the ballad became the ideal duet for Leigh and Eric, with the brothers making the song their own via their yearning delivery and the house band's lush arrangement. "I think it's a beautiful song, but I couldn't picture us doing it," says Eric. "It surprised me with how it turned out. It was too good to not put on the record."

The members of R.E.M. certainly agree. "It's incredible! They did a great job," says vocalist Michael Stipe. "It really re-focuses the song and lyric in a great way." Bassist Mike Mills offers, "Wow. I really didn't see that one coming. I love it," with guitarist Peter Buck echoing those remarks: "Wow. Incredible." Even Bill Berry, R.E.M.'s former drummer chimes in, saying, "It's the best cover of it I've heard."

However, it's "Travelin' Day," the countriest song on Mockingbird, that packs a poignant punch. The first tune they wrote with Ferguson for the session, it was born of grief: Ferguson's stepfather had just died. The Gibsons lost their dad six years earlier and together the writers bonded over their loss. "We were talking about how Ferg's stepfather faced death and how impressive it was," says Leigh, "and it really inspired us."

Looking back on the brisk week and a half of writing and recording Mockingbird in Nashville, the Gibson Brothers are confident in what they've accomplished. This is an album that exemplifies the sibling bond and is poised to introduce them to an entirely new audience.

"We'll be able to reach more people than we have in the past," says Eric. "I don't want to downplay what we accomplished in bluegrass, but I didn't know our voices would suit this variety of music so well."

His brother agrees. "If you thought you knew the Gibson Brothers and had them figured out," Leigh says, "well, maybe you didn't."

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PRESS RELEASE: 


THE GIBSON BROTHERS RETURN WITH MOCKINGBIRD, OUT NOVEMBER 9TH VIA EASY EYE SOUND

DEBUT FIRST SINGLE “LAY YOUR BODY DOWN” VIA ROLLING STONE COUNTRY

BROADCAST DEBUT VIA SIRIUSXM’S OUTLAW COUNTRY (CHANNEL 60)

FEATURES PRODUCTION BY DAN AUERBACH & FERGIE FERGUSON AND PERFORMANCES BY AUERBACH, GENE CHRISMAN, BILLY SANFORD, AND DAVE ROE

 

This morning, Bluegrass royalty Leigh and Eric Gibson announce the release of their 14th album, Mockingbird, produced by Grammy Award winners Dan Auerbach and Fergie Ferguson. The album is not just a return to form for the Gibson Brothers, but also a rebirth, and finds the brothers performing bluegrass, as well as a mix of country, soul and seventies rock. The album cements the sibling duo as players, songwriters and vocalists at the peak of their power, harmonizing as only siblings can, and Mockingbird’s 11 tracks draw on much of the brothers' experiences being raised on the family farm in Northern New York. "The songs on this album are the sounds we heard growing up, riding around with our dad, who was a farmer, in his pickup, or with our mom in her station wagon,” says Leigh. “This sound was on the radio.” He cites the Eagles, Bob Seger, Tom Petty, and the warm country sounds of Don Williams, Emmylou Harris and Waylon Jennings as influences for the album. Mockingbird is available for pre-order on all formats here.

This morning, the band debuted “Lay Your Body Down,”  the first single off Mockingbird, via Rolling Stone Country who say the track “finds the sweet spot between Laurel Canyon folk-rock and early Seventies Rolling Stones with big, layered vocal harmonies and crunchy blues flourishes.” Listen to it here. Additionally, SiriusXM’s ­­Outlaw Country (channel 60) played the song in Mojo Nixon’s broadcast earlier this week.

As Northerners growing up in a Southern business, The Gibson Brothers had to work twice as hard as the bands from the South to pay their dues, and were the first group from that far north to earn the coveted title of IBMA Entertainers of the Year, which they secured two years in a row. This outsider perspective is something innately familiar to the Brothers, and an asset, though this was not always the case. The pair played the Nashville game two decades ago, while in their early 20s, and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too "retro" for modern country music. Today, such characterizations, along with their authenticity, set them apart and their talent as writers and vocalists allows them to float seamlessly between genres. It’s for this reason that they chose to work with a rock producer, Auerbach, and a band of legendary session players like drummer Gene Chrisman and guitarist Billy Sanford for Mockingbird. “I was raised on bluegrass music, and The Gibson Brothers are one of this generation’s greatest in that style,” said Auerbach. “I’ve been a fan of theirs for a long time, and when Fergie brought up the idea of doing a non-traditional type of album with them, I jumped at the chance.” 

Songs like "Cool Drink of Water" and "Love the Land" exemplify that late-Sixties and early-Seventies vibe. The former sounds like something Elvis, at the height of his '68 Comeback cool, would perform, and provides the album with its title, as Leigh sings about the "song so sweet" of the mockingbird.  "Come Down," evokes the 70’s sound of radio rock kings America and "Lay Your Body Down" concours a passionate Exile on Main Street style R&B.

Mockingbird's most left-field track, however, is a cover of R.E.M.'s 1993 song "Everybody Hurts." Suggested by Ferguson, the ballad became the ideal duet for Leigh and Eric, with the brothers making the song their own via their yearning delivery and the house band's lush arrangement. "I think it's a beautiful song, but I couldn't picture us doing it," says Eric. "It surprised me with how it turned out. It was too good to not put on the record." The members of R.E.M. agree. "It's incredible! They did a great job," says vocalist Michael Stipe. Bill Berry, R.E.M.'s former drummer, and one of the original writers of the song, chimes in, saying, "It's the best cover of it I've heard."
 

Most of all, Mockingbird dispels the notion that the Gibson’s are solely a bluegrass act. "I don't want to downplay what we accomplished in bluegrass,” says Eric, but I didn't know our voices would suit this variety of music so well." His brother agrees. "If you thought you knew the Gibson Brothers and had them figured out," Leigh says, "well, maybe you didn't."


Mockingbird Track Listing

  01 Travelin' Day

  02 Cool Drink Of Water

  03 Love The Land

  04 Sweet Lucinda

  05 Special One

  06 Lay Your Body Down

  07 So Much Love In My Baby's Eyes

  08 Come Down

  09 Everybody Hurts

  10 I'm A Better Man

  11 Not Gonna Be Tonight

The Gibson Brothers Tour Dates- http://www.gibsonbrothers.com/tour-1/
Sep 07 /// Caffe Lena /// Saratoga Springs, NY

Sep 08 /// Caffe Lena /// Saratoga Springs, NY

Sep 14 ///Cockaigne Ski Resort Brewgrass Bluegrass Musc Festival /// Cherry Creek, NY

Sep 15 /// Kirkland Art Center /// Clinton, NY

Sep 21 /// Olathe Live! Concert Series /// Olathe, KS

Sep 21 /// Olathe Live! Concert Series w/ Kelly Hunt /// Olathe, KS

Sep 29 /// IBMA's Wide Open Bluegrass Festival /// Raleigh, NC

Oct 06 /// 3 Sisters Music Festival /// Chattanooga, TN

Oct 07 /// The Holland Theatre /// Bellefontaine, OH

Oct 11/// A Little Help From My Friends @ Clayton Center /// Maryville, TN

Oct 12 /// A Little Help From My Friends @ Imperial Theatre /// Augusta, GA

Oct 20 /// Bloomin' Bluegrass Festival /// Farmers Branch, TX

Oct 26 /// Anderson Bluegrass Festival /// Anderson, SC

Nov 10 /// November Palatka Bluegrass Festival /// Palatka, FL

Dec 07 /// Proctor's Theatre /// Schenectady, NY

Dec 08 /// Barre Opera House /// Barre, VT

Dec 13 //// Sellersville Theater /// Sellersville, PA

Dec 16 /// Earlville Opera House /// Earlville, NY

Jan 04 /// New Year's Bluegrass Festival /// Jekyll Island, GA

Feb 02 /// Stone Mountain Arts Center /// Brownfield, ME

Feb 14 /// February Palatka Festival /// Palatka, FL

Mar 09 /// Stoughton Opera House /// Stoughton, WI

 

For more information, please contact Mary Moyer (mary@qprime.com) or Emilio Herce (emilio@qprime.com) at Q Prime 212.302.9790.

 

Press Photos: 
Photo Credit: 
Alysse Gafkjen
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Photo Credit: 
Alysse Gafkjen
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